EU Urges Rwanda to Stop Supporting M23 Rebels in DR Congo

The European Union on Saturday urged Rwanda to stop supporting the M23 rebel group, which has captured swaths of territory in the North Kivu province of neighboring Democratic Republic of Congo.

The DRC, along with the United States and several European countries, has repeatedly accused its smaller central African neighbor of backing the M23, although Kigali, Rwanda’s capital, denies the charge.

The Tutsi rebel group has in recent months advanced to within a few dozen kilometers of provincial capital Goma.

EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell said Saturday that the European bloc had urged Rwanda to “stop supporting the M23 and use all means to press the M23 to comply with the decisions taken by the EAC (East African Community)” and at a November summit in Angola.

“It also firmly urges all states of the region to prevent the provision of any support to armed groups active in the DRC,” Borrell said.

He called on Kinshasa to “take all measures necessary to protect the civilian population in its territory.”


Under heavy international pressure to disarm, M23 joined a ceremony last week to deliver the strategic town of Kibumba to an East African military force as a “goodwill gesture” for peace.

The EAC also said the group had to withdraw to the border between the DRC, Uganda and Rwanda.

However, the Congolese army promptly dubbed the Kibumba handover a “sham.”

Borrell’s comments came after a U.N. experts’ report on DR Congo indicated it had collected proof of “direct intervention” by Rwandan defense forces inside DRC territory between at least November 2021 and last October.

The experts’ report says Rwandan troops launched operations to reinforce the M23 against the mainly Hutu Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda (FDLR), notably by supplying weapons, ammunition and uniforms.

Kigali sees the FDLR as a threat that justifies interventions inside the DRC.

Rwanda has also accused the DRC, where presidential elections are scheduled for next December, of using the conflict for political purposes as well as fabricating a November massacre of at least 131 civilians.

A U.N. probe blamed those deaths on M23 rebels.

In a statement Saturday, Kinshasa welcomed the findings of the U.N. experts, which it said “put an end to the lies and manipulations” of Rwanda.

Given the gravity of the allegations, it called for the U.N. Security Council to examine the experts’ report with a view to possible sanctions against Rwanda.

Meanwhile, Rwanda’s President Paul Kagame blamed Kinshasa for the chaos in its war-torn eastern regions in his New Year’s address.

“After spending tens of billions of dollars on peacekeeping over the past two decades, the security situation in Eastern Congo is worse than ever,” Kagame said in a statement Saturday.

“To explain this failure, some in the international community blame Rwanda, even though they know very well that the true responsibility lies primarily with the government of the DRC. It is high time that the unwarranted vilification of Rwanda stopped.”

 

 

 

Source: Voice of America

Nikkiso Clean Energy & Industrial Gases Group Announces Expansion of Service for Middle East and Northern Africa

Nikkiso CE&IG new Service Facility for Middle East and Northern Africa TEMECULA, Calif., Jan. 30, 2023 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Nikkiso Clean Energy & Industrial Gases Group (“Group”), a part of the Nikkiso Co., Ltd (Japan) group of companies, is proud to announce yet another expansion of their manufacturing and service capabilities for the Middle East […]

Nikkiso CE&IG new Service Facility for Middle East and Northern Africa

Nikkiso CE&IG new Service Facility for Middle East and Northern Africa, based in Sharjah Free Zone

TEMECULA, Calif., Jan. 30, 2023 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Nikkiso Clean Energy & Industrial Gases Group (“Group”), a part of the Nikkiso Co., Ltd (Japan) group of companies, is proud to announce yet another expansion of their manufacturing and service capabilities for the Middle East and Northern Africa markets. With this expansion, they will be providing pump and turboexpander aftermarket repairs of their full line, including J.C. Carter pumps. Their new state-of-the-art service center will allow repairs to be made locally rather than the need to ship elsewhere.

The new facility, based in the Sharjah Free Zone, was established to provide expanded support for the Middle East and Northern Africa markets. They have added field service support, and shop technicians specifically trained to support Marine, J.C. Carter, Nikkiso Cryogenic Pumps (ACD and Nikkiso Cryo) and Turboexpanders. In addition to in-shop and on-site repairs, they will provide aftermarket service.

“With this facility, we will be able to respond more quickly to our customer’s needs, providing individual support and solutions expansion. Nikkiso CE&IG will now be able to provide greater service and support to our customers with our local presence,” according to Jim Estes, President of Nikkiso Cryogenic Services.

This expansion represents their commitment to and support of the growth of the Middle Eastern and North African market.

ABOUT CRYOGENIC INDUSTRIES
Cryogenic Industries, Inc. (now a member of Nikkiso Co., Ltd.) member companies manufacture and service engineered cryogenic gas processing equipment (pumps, turboexpanders, heat exchangers, etc.) and process plants for Industrial Gases, and Natural Gas Liquefaction (LNG), Hydrogen Liquefaction (LH2) and Organic Rankine Cycle for Waste Heat Recovery. Founded over 50 years ago, Cryogenic Industries is the parent company of ACD, Nikkiso Cryo, Nikkiso Integrated Cryogenic Solutions, Cosmodyne and Cryoquip and a commonly controlled group of 20 operating entities.

For more information, please visit www.nikkisoCEIG.com and www.nikkiso.com.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Anna Quigley
+1.951.383.3314
aquigley@cryoind.com

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at:
https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/a782646f-6550-4069-9f74-4f531a3eae7d

GlobeNewswire Distribution ID 8739306

COVID-19 still international health emergency: WHO

GENEVA— The World Health Organization (WHO) said that the COVID-19 pandemic still constitutes a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC), the WHO’s highest alert level.The announcement came amid the recent increase of weekly reported de…

GENEVA— The World Health Organization (WHO) said that the COVID-19 pandemic still constitutes a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC), the WHO’s highest alert level.

The announcement came amid the recent increase of weekly reported deaths worldwide. After its quarterly assessment meeting on the COVID-19 pandemic on Friday, the WHO’s International Health Regulations (2005) Emergency Committee announced on Monday that COVID-19 continues to constitute a PHEIC, which has been concurred by WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

COVID-19 remains a dangerous infectious disease with the capacity to cause substantial damage to health systems, the committee said in a statement, while acknowledging that the COVID-19 pandemic may be approaching an inflection point.

Although infection or vaccination may lead to higher levels of population immunity globally and limit the impact of morbidity and mortality, “there is little doubt that this virus will remain a permanently established pathogen in humans and animals for the foreseeable future,” the committee said.

It then called for long-term public health action that will prioritize the mitigation of COVID-19 impact on morbidity and mortality.

Meanwhile, the committee recommends that countries should achieve 100 percent vaccination coverage of high-priority groups, improve reporting of SARS-CoV-2 surveillance data to the WHO, and ensure long-term availability of medical countermeasures, such as COVID-19 vaccines, diagnostics and therapeutics.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

At least 28 killed in two attacks in Burkina Faso

OUAGADOUGOU— At least 28 people, including soldiers and civilians, were killed in two separate gunmen attacks on Sunday and Monday in Burkina Faso, a regional governor and the army have revealed.Fifteen civilians were killed on Sunday by unidentified a…

OUAGADOUGOU— At least 28 people, including soldiers and civilians, were killed in two separate gunmen attacks on Sunday and Monday in Burkina Faso, a regional governor and the army have revealed.

Fifteen civilians were killed on Sunday by unidentified armed men in the province of Comoe in western Burkina Faso on the border with Cote d’Ivoire, the governor of the Cascades region, Colonel Jean Charles dit Yenapono Some said.

The incident involved two mini-buses that were intercepted in the village of Linguekoro in the province by unidentified gunmen on Sunday evening. Nine passengers, out of a total of 24 of the mini-buses were freed, while the two mini cars were later set on fire and the other passengers abducted. On Monday, the bodies of 15 victims with bullet impacts were found near the village where they were abducted, said the official in a statement.

The army also reported on Tuesday in a separate statement that 13 people, including 10 gendarmes, two army auxiliaries and a civilian were killed on Monday in a terrorist attack by unidentified armed men in the locality of Falangoutou in the Province of Seno.

None of these attacks have been claimed so far.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

Pope Francis Arrives in DRC with Message of Peace, Reconciliation

Pope Francis arrives in the Democratic Republic of Congo Tuesday on his first visit to the country with Africa’s largest Catholic population. Francis will be in the DRC, a country struggling with decades of conflict, until Friday, when he goes to the w…

Pope Francis arrives in the Democratic Republic of Congo Tuesday on his first visit to the country with Africa’s largest Catholic population. Francis will be in the DRC, a country struggling with decades of conflict, until Friday, when he goes to the world’s youngest country, South Sudan. Analysts hope for peace in the region.

Pope Francis arrived Tuesday in the DRC capital, Kinshasa, to begin a six-day visit to the Democratic Republic of Congo and South Sudan.

The pope brings bring a message of peace and reconciliation to the two countries, which have struggled through years of conflict.

A pastor invited to meet with the pope, who asked to be identified only as Herale, told VOA that he hopes the Pope’s message will help end the fighting in the country’s east.

He said the Pope is well known both religiously and politically. Congo has numerous problems, squabbles, and conflicts. The pope only needs to say a few words to put an end to the conflict in the east, the pastor says. Francis has the ability to assist the country and bring peace.

The pope meets with Congolese President Felix Tshisekedi, government officials, diplomats, civil society leaders, and victims of conflict from the east.

On Wednesday, the 86-year-old will also hold a public prayer in Kinshasa.

Pope Francis had planned to visit Goma in North Kivu province, but he canceled his visit because of the resurgence of conflict between the M23 rebel group and Congolese forces.

Researcher and political analyst Ntanyoma Rukumbuzi said the pope will remind the world of the ongoing conflict in the DRC.

“Because of security problems affecting civilians in this region, his message was to support and call for attention to atrocities taking place in this region. During his visit, the situation has drastically deteriorated. One can expect his message as it was before would possibly change. He is going to change his tone to emphasize that civilians should be protected,” said Rukumbuzi.

In addition to the chronic unrest in several eastern provinces, the DRC is preparing for an election later this year and the prospect of political violence remains a concern.

Rukumbuzi said the pope will speak out about the political situation and upcoming elections.

“The Pope will talk about the country’s leadership and what to expect from its leaders, and as it has been mostly the stance of the Roman Catholic in DRC it plays a huge role within the political arena, domestic political arena, but they are also among the vocal critic when it comes to the way the Congolese elite manage the country. The Pope will be very clear on this issue,” said Rukumbuzi.

The country’s Catholic leadership criticized then-president Joseph Kabila when he postponed elections for more than two years starting in 2016.

The election was finally held in December 2018 and won by the current president, Tshisekedi, in a disputed vote. Tshisekedi’s term ends this year and polls are expected in December.

Pastor Herale said politicians must prioritize the interests of the country.

“Congo is preparing for elections, and politicians are competing for political positions, but security is poor. He’s coming to Congo, which is in a lot of trouble, and we hope he’ll be able to convince politicians to speak one language and agree to protect the country,” he said.

Pope Francis is scheduled to be in Congo until Friday, when he heads to South Sudan.

Source: Voice of America